Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Opal

Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Opal

Gemstones have played various roles in the myths and legends of human cultures throughout history.

Some tell a story or are believed to have special powers, but all of them share a common beauty.

Each gemstone is unique with a special colour, birthplace and story.

Gemstones come in every colour of the rainbow and are gathered from all corners of the world.

With each coloured gemstone possessing a unique creation of beautiful colour.

Some gemstones have been treasure since before history began and others were discovered only recently.

At the beginning of each month comes a new stone, some months have two gemstones and lucky me, December as three!!!!!!!!

Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Opal

In ancient times, the Opal was known as the Queen of Gems because it encompassed the colours of all other gems.

Guide to gemstones - some myths and legends - Opal
Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Opal

Each Opal is truly a one-of-a-kind as unique as our fingerprints.

Some prefer the calming flashes of blues and greens.

Others love the bright reds and yellows.

Which colours do your prefer?

Its array of colours seen as you turn and move the Opal, colours which play and shifts, gives you a gem that can be worn with a multitude of outfits.

Australia’s Lighting Ridge is known for its rare and stunning black Opals.

The ideal Opal is one that displays broad patterns covering the surface with all the colours of the rainbow, including red.

Since Opals are the most individual gemstone with its range of colours be sure to choose one the show cases your colour preference and pattern.

Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Tourmaline

Available in a spectrum of colours as well as colour combinations Tourmaline lives up to its name which means mixed stone.

With a myriad of colours, Tourmaline can easily enhance any jewellery collection.

Guide to gemstones - some myths and legends - Tourmaline
Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Tourmaline

Cranberry reds, hot magentas, bubble-gum pinks, peaches and oranges, canary yellows, mint, grass and forest greens, ocean blues and violets.

Tourmaline is all of these and more.

Tourmaline is also known for displaying several colours in one gemstone. These bi-colour or tri-colour gems are formed in many combinations and are highly prized.

One multi-colour variety is known as Watermelon Tourmaline and features green, pink and white colour bands not unlike a watermelon.

To resemble its namesake the gemstone is cut into thin slices having a pink centre, white ring and a green edge.

Paraiba Tourmaline

Paraiba Tourmaline gemstones have become one of the most precious and valuable gems in the world, even though it was only discovered in the 1980s.

Guide to gemstones - some myths and legends - Tourmaline
Guide to gemstones – some myths and legends – Tourmaline

Its rare shades of electric blues and greens are reminiscent of the blue ocean shores of Paraiba where the gem is mined.

These unique, vivid blue and green colours are not found in any other gemstones in the world.

 

For more information on this fascinating gemstone, please click hereĀ https://www.minerals.net/gemstone/tourmaline_gemstone.aspx

Next month – Citrine

Lorraine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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